What's the best way to upgrade from Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64 to Windows 8 Pro x64

Discussion in 'Installation, Setup and Upgrades' started by brkkab123, Oct 22, 2012.

  1. brkkab123

    brkkab123

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    I'm planning on upgrading from Windows 7 Professional SP1 x64 to Windows 8 Pro on either November 2nd or 3rd. What's the best way to upgrade from 7 to 8 if I have a ssd with Windows & programs on it ? I also created a Games folder in 7, in C:\Program Files (x86) and then pointed Disk Management to that folder and let Windows 7 know to install my Games on my 2nd WD Caviar Black 1.0 TB hard drive. Aalso giving that drive the letter E: in Disk Management.
    On my ist WD Caviar Black 1.0 TB. hard drive I have Contacts, Documents, Favorites, Links, Music, Pictures, Saved Games, Searches and Videos for my account & the locked Administrator account.
    In Windows 8 do I move those folders the same way as I did in Windows 7, or is it done differently now ?
    Also, is there a way to move where Windows Store & Games For Windows Live install's games at ?
    If not, I'll have to wait until December and get a 240 GB. ssd and then install 8, as my 120 GB. ssd only has about 32-35 GB. free space.
     
    brkkab123, Oct 22, 2012
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  2. brkkab123

    Core coffee & gigabytes Moderator

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    According to what I have read, you should be able to upgrade directly without losing settings, documents, or applications. You shouldn't have to move things around to keep them working.

    For performance reasons, however, I highly recommend you consider a clean installation, opting to install all games and applications on the second hard drive, and keeping the SSD primarily for the operating system and temporary files, possible encoding jobs and other things which really benefit from constant, repetitive file access.

    I am using a 180 GB SSD, and I first installed Windows 8 on it fresh, opting to install Adobe products, Office, and some Steam games all on the SSD. Finding myself constantly out of a safe amount of free space, I wiped the drive and installed only the core system on the SSD, and all my games and applications on my regular old 1TB HDD. There is no noticeable difference in application or game performance, and I don't have to worry about the OS partition running out of space.
     
    Core, Oct 22, 2012
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  3. brkkab123

    brkkab123

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    I'm skeptical on the upgrade route. I did that from XP to Vista and my pc never functioned properly until I did a clean install. However the way you could do that doesn't work in 8 anymore.
    The old way was to use the Upgrade disk do the first install booting from the disk. When Vista or 7 asked for a product key, you left it blank and clicked no on the windows that popped up. Then in Vista or 7, you did a upgrade install and entered the product key.
    See when I used Build Preview, Consumer Preview & Release Preview, I created a partition on one of my caviar drives and didn't mess with any of my folder locations.
    I'm wondering if I should use 7's Windows Easy Transfer in 7. Then install 8, update it and install Windows Media Center and then run 8's Windows Easy Transfer (if 8 still has it) and then reinstall everything, as the Windows Easy Transfer will keep my settings intact
    I think having Games the way I do and using my Xbox 360 with Windows Media Center will most likely throw I curve ball into doing the upgrade from 7 to 8, that keeps all settings.
    Perfect example of this is as follows. After Service Pack 1 for 7 came out, I had to go back into disk management and resetup the way I have my games. The games folder I made in C:\Program Files (x86) was still there. They were still in drive e:, if you opened it, but in disk management itself it didn't show the C:\Program Files (x86)\Games listing. It only showed the drive e: as being the drive letter.
    I doubt Microsoft got around to fixing that, as it would've been done in 7, too.
    I did a clean install of 7 last week and it's still the same procedure needing to be repeated after SP1's install.
    Just like there's a code a Xbox 360 gives you, that you have to enter in Windows Media Center for it to work properly.
    I doubt that transfers from 7 to 8 in any way of how you upgrade to 8 including W.E.T.
    .
     

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    brkkab123, Oct 22, 2012
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  4. brkkab123

    Octagon

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    I do not know how to change the location where the RT games are installed, possibly there is a registry hack for that, the default location they install to is Program Files\WindowsApps. However, I did an upgrade with a Windows 8 preview. It took much more time than a clean install, which is fast, and much less than a reinstallation of all apps, which is also not that long since I install a lot portable and have all the installers on a USB drive ready for immediate use. The upgrade detected a few incompatible apps and one app (Delphi 2007) did not work after the upgrade, but that was understandible since even clean install of Delphi 2007 on Windows 8 is tricky.

    If you do upgrade, then all the redirected folders should stay redirected. http://www.eightforums.com/tutorials/4275-user-profiles-relocate-another-partition-disk.html may help for clean install.

    I do not see how upgrade can hinder performance provided you do not have unused applications due to be uninstalled long ago. According to my experience, Windows 8 upgrade works (finally). It is also a safe option since Windows 8 has a nice option of forgetting everything and starting anew, thus if the upgrade does not work it will not create any registration problems.
     
    Octagon, Oct 27, 2012
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  5. brkkab123

    brkkab123

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    I guess I'll find out next Friday night/Saturday morning. Purchasing the upgrade Friday morning and installing it later that night after 10:00 P.M. after 7's done recording t.v. show's for the night. They're on a 2nd hard drive, so they won't be lost. Then I'm going to let Windows 7 run a backup after making sure my software's all updated. Then the 8 install will be done. I may also run a Windows Easy Transfer in 7 to my backup drive just to play it safe.
     
    brkkab123, Oct 27, 2012
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  6. brkkab123

    mahanddeem

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    The best way is : Do a clean install from installation disk , make one if you don't have it (easy if purchased from Microsoft store)
     
    mahanddeem, Dec 19, 2012
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  7. brkkab123

    brkkab123

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    I just found out something. Doing a upgrade install shouldn't be listed at all. The system reserved partition in Windows 8 needs more space than Windows Vista's or 7's does. If you do an upgrade install from Vista or 7, that system reserved partition's size doesn't change from what it already was. Thus, a clean install is a must do, especially if you ever plan on using Windows 8's refresh feature down the road.
     
    brkkab123, Dec 19, 2012
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  8. brkkab123

    mahanddeem

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    Windows 7 reserves 100mb partition before the partition you install to (like c:\) and uses around 15mb from it... I wounder if windows 8 needs more than that space!
     
    mahanddeem, Dec 19, 2012
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  9. brkkab123

    brkkab123

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    Windows 8 needs 350 mb.
     
    brkkab123, Dec 19, 2012
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  10. brkkab123

    Nibiru2012 Moderator

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    Always do a "Clean" install (Windows calls it a Custom install.)

    I don't know why users waste their money purchasing an "upgrade version" when for a few dollars more, they could get the OEM version or the standard Windows 8 retail version.

    We hashed this time and time again at the Windows 7 forum and the answer is always the same: DO A CLEAN INSTALL... Period!
     
    Nibiru2012, Dec 20, 2012
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  11. brkkab123

    Core coffee & gigabytes Moderator

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    The reserved partition is just a boot partition, I don't know why it would need more than 100 mb anyway, but in my case, since I partitioned my drive myself and didn't let Windows do it, I don't have the boot partition at all, so it's hardly mandatory.
     
    Core, Dec 20, 2012
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  12. brkkab123

    Nibiru2012 Moderator

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    I have never worried about the fact that Windows decides to install a "special" partition. It's merely a drop in the bucket of the total amount of disk space involved.

    It was so humorous a few years ago, all those n00bs whining about the evil 100 MB partition. For me and most users it's an insignificant thing. I mean really now, is it
    really harming anything? Are some users that paranoid about using 100 MB or 350 MB of their HDD or SSD for the partition?

    I just updated to a Samsung 840 Pro 128 GB SSD. Now Windows sees the drive as 119.24 GB or a 112,101.76 MB so a 350 MB partition is less than .003% of disk usage. Heck, I
    have my SSD provisioned with a 20% dead space for better performance.
     
    Nibiru2012, Dec 22, 2012
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