How to try and like Windows 8

Discussion in 'Windows 8 Support' started by davehc, Aug 28, 2012.

  1. davehc

    davehc

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    I read, all over the web, comments regarding the dislike for the forthcoming Windows 8, and in particular, and in fact almost exclusively, criticism of the (as it was called) Metro.. I am urged to print my own thoughts on the subject.
    My first comment is that, whilst, from the beginning, Microsoft and followers have touted the Metro as the new desktop, this was a mistake. I cannot see it as such. To me it is a new, graphical, Start menu. It is designed, primarily, for touchscreens, but there is no reason why it cannot, with a little compromise, be adjusted for normal mouse use.
    The following is based on those thoughts. I am indicating how I have found a use for it, or an alternative method of successfully using Windows 8. The OS is an advancement on Windows 7, in performance, but not enough, in my opinion, to warrant the purchase of it - particularly for mass purchasers.
    However.here I go. two basic methods. One for those who would like to try and use the Metro Start menu, another for those who want to be more familiar in old surroundings.

    Metro users.
    Let me ask, here, do you, users, really have a daily requirement for all of those apps which are put into the old legacy menu, and now Metro. Those who are heavily into graphic operations may need more than me, and there are other aspects of computer use with the same need. But I have eliminated mine to ten programs I use in my daily work.
    So, on the Metro screen, let us right click an app icon. A bar menu appears on the bottom, like this:

    [​IMG]Here, as you can see, you can Unpin it, which tucks it away. You can even Uninstall it if that is the way you want to go. Even better, which really is concerned with my next section, you can Pin it to the start.
    When you have done this, you can rearrange the remaining icons, in your preferred order.

    Now comes a partly hidden function. Click, over on the bottom right, the small minus sign. Now you will have a miniaturised picture of your Metro. Right click any of the groups, which you have prearranged. Another bar menu! You can name those groups.
    As I stated, I have eliminated mine to a mere ten items, but for the purpose of this Demo, here is my full Metro, on a complete and new installation:

    [​IMG]

    So, there we have a graphical start menu. What about all those unused apps. - Just right Click on the Metro, and, bottom right, is some text "All Apps". Click there and you have a whole bunch of every app on your computer.
    Now, if you click any app, on your Metro all "All Apps" Window, it will open in the normal way. But, if you close it, you will find yourself on the legacy desktop. Bu***ger. But click the "Windows" key, and you are back in your Metro Start menu.
    That is all, in the context of this post, there is to say on the use of the Metro

    You don't want Metro.

    Fair enough. If you click the Desktop icon, in Metro, you will find yourself on the legacy desktop. Darn, its totally empty. No problem, it is customisable in exactly the manner to which you've been used to - right click and "personalise".
    But where is the good old start menu? A big omission, on Microsoft's part, to omit that. But no problem again.
    Download and install the well known "Classic Menu".

    http://classicshell.sourceforge.net/

    This is incredibly customisable,. It even has a choice of start orbs. Within the options is one which enables a user to boot straight through to the desktop, bypassing the Metro completely. Classic, can be set up almost 100% to emulate the old Windows 7 menu.
    But maybe you would like to use one of the other third party start menus? There are several around, if you google, but I don't think, imho, that they compete with the Classic. If, again, that is the road you wish to take, forget about the "Classic" download and install the attached little gem. Select the option to bypass the Metro. Install your own menu.
    One last. If you want to persist, and use the facilities available, right click in the bottom left corner of the desktop.. This popup has become known as the "Power" menu. It is also customisable, but this involves a little hacking and manipulation, and I don't consider it to be the subject of this post.

    That's about it, but a comment for your thoughts.

    In Windows 7, for example, you are in and using an App. You close it and wish to go to another App.
    1. Click the Orb.
    2. Click "All programs"
    3. Click your desired shortcut.
    3 clicks.

    In Windows 8
    1. Click the "Windows" key
    2. Click your shortcut Icon.
    -See the difference.

    I should also add that my personal use of a computer, often takes me to a situation where I need to have several windows open on the desktop. This cannot be done with Metro Apps - so far. To me, the solution was simple - I don't use them. You can find a wealth of alternative, non metro apps on the web, which can accomplish the same things. I have weakened and downloaded a couple of time wasters from the "Store" MS Card games and Backgammon as two examples
    There are other aspects of Windows 8, which users could comment on. IMO, it has a slightly improved performance. I would not consider that improvement enough to warrant its purchase, particular for an office with a multi purchase requirement. And, of course, even for a desktop user, I cannot grasp the idea of the average secretary typing on a touchscreen - lol. - but that is an option.

    Good luck. I hope it will work for you, but do try and have fun exploring the possibilities I have mentioned
     

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    davehc, Aug 28, 2012
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    yodap, Ian and Core like this.
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  2. davehc

    yodap

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    Good article Dave!
    I agree. This is a solid OS and needs to be given a chance. Once I click on desktop, I never see Metro again unless I want to. It's easy to create a quick launch bar or set this program up almost any way you want. There is a learning curve with every OS and this is no different. Tablets and touch screens are too pricy for what I need and I won't be upgrading my W7 systems but I won't shy away from installing on a new build either.
     
    yodap, Aug 30, 2012
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  3. davehc

    davehc

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    Thanks. I do think that some dissenting testers are missing the plot with this OS. I have never since DOS closed, used an OS which was so infinitely flexible, for any users.
    I am beginning to think I ahve my pink glasses on - lol, over it. I have been a devoted member, and heavy subscriber, to another forum which has been through XP - Windows 7, and now Windows 8. There is a minority of posters on the 8 forum , four to be exact, who seem to devote their time in attacking anyone who even suggests that they half like Windows 8 (I am not one of the principle victims - yet) It has got so out of hand, with the hijacking of threads, that, after many years, I am contemplating leaving the site. It will, unfortunately, be my loss.
     
    davehc, Aug 30, 2012
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  4. davehc

    Victor Leigh

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    That was good. Still I think we are possibly barking up the wrong tree, so to say.

    Those people who want to use the Windows 7 interface should just stick to Windows 7. Nobody is forcing them to migrate to Windows 8. Let's use Windows 8 as it's meant to be used. I believe anyone with an open mind can learn to use and love the Windows 8 interface.
     
    Victor Leigh, Aug 31, 2012
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  5. davehc

    davehc

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    Thanks for the input, Victor. My point of view, though, as outlined , is that Windows 8 does freely offer the possibility of using the more familiar desktop - IF the user wishes. Although an alternative, I do believe that for those users, and from Microsoft's standpoint, that is how it is meant to be used, according to your preference and hardware (Touchscreenn/tablet)
    But you are spot on. If they do not think the modest improvements in other directions, are worth it, then stay with Windows 7 and stop griping. It is a superb OS.
     
    davehc, Aug 31, 2012
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